INVESTING IN COMIC BOOKS 

Compiled and edited by comic book historian Terry Hoknes www.HoknesComics.com     hoknes@hotmail.com

Most Valuable DAVID McKAY COMICS published each year

Key investment comics and historically important issues

These are the 3 most valuable DAVID McKAY COMICS comic books published in every year

(Overstreet 2013 guide NM prices)

These books have proven to be consistently the most in demand key issues ever and are the best investments long term.

This list only include regular cover mass printed editions.  No variants or limited edition versions included.

This is the first time a yearly comparison has ever been made and the purpose is to show a few things. 

First of all it does truly highlight the major key books of every year.  It also shows quickly which titles seems to pop up the most often and are truly the most expensive series to collect.  Some titles are just more collected than others and bring higher $$ amounts even to non-key issues in a run. 

Note that some years have lesser keys standing at the front of the line and are for their age a better investment. This can always be seen with books from all eras's which are much more affordable and scarcer than any more recent books.

David McKay Publications (also known as David McKay Company) was an American book publisher which also published some of the first comic books, including the long-running titles Ace Comics, King Comics, and Magic Comics; as well as collections of such popular comic strips asBlondie, Dick Tracy, and Mandrake the Magician. McKay was also the publisher of the Fodor's travel guides.  David McKay was born in Dysart, Scotland, on June 24, 1860. At the age of 11, he came to the United States with his parents. At the age of 13, he began working for J. B. Lippincott & Co., learning the bookselling trade. By the age of 21, he was placed in charge of the miscellaneous catalog of books by publisher Rees Welsh. One year later, upon hearing McKay had been offered a position with a rival publisher, Welsh asked McKay to take the helm, offering to sell the entire publishing firm to him. In September 1882, with $500 of his own money and $2,500 in borrowed money and notes, McKay began his own publishing company on South 9th Street in Philadelphia.  At age 25, McKay published the first collected set of Shakespeare’s works in the United States. By December 1905, McKay had absorbed many rival publishing houses into his own, and was publishing books in almost every popular genre of the time, including world literature, textbooks, and a number of children’s books.  In 1935, the company recognized the potential of the comic book medium and began selling collections of such popular strips as Henry and Popeye. In 1936 they began publishing collections ofKing Features Syndicate strips in King Comics, and in 1937 followed with the Ace Comics title. Ace Comics #11, the first appearance of The Phantom, is regarded by many to be a key issue in the history of comics, as it introduced one of the first of the costumed heroes, leading to the Golden Age of superheroes in comics.    McKay’s son Alexander would follow in his father’s shoes by taking over the house to go on to publish Walt Disney’s first Mickey Mouse comics, the Blondie and Dagwood comic series, and numerous other notable works. David McKay Publications essentially ceased publishing comics in 1950.  In 1973, David McKay Publications purchased Henry Z. Walck Publications, a publisher of scholarly and children's books.   Random House purchased David McKay Publications in 1986.

1931-1933

MICKEY MOUSE #1 $1,800.00 / MICKEY MOUSE #3 $1,600.00 / MICKEY MOUSE #2 $1,200.00 

1934

MICKEY MOUSE #4 $1,050.00 / SECRET AGENT X-9 #1 $650.00 / SECRET AGENT X-9 #2 $535.00

1935

POPEYE #1 $800.00 / HENRY #1 $550.00 / LITTLE ANNIE ROONEY #1 $510.00

1936

KING COMICS #1 $10,000.00 / KING COMICS #2 $3,600.00 / KING COMICS #3 $2,450.00

1937

FEATURE BOOK: DICK TRACY $23,000.00 / FEATURE BOOK: POPEYE $14,000.00 / ACE COMICS #1 $5,500.00

1938

ACE COMICS #11 $1,600.00 / FEATURE BOOK #9 $1,550.00 / FEATURE BOOK #20 $1,500.00

1939

MAGIC COMICS #1 $4,600.00 / ACE COMICS #26 $1,700.00 / MAGIC COMICS #2 $1,625.00

1940

FUTURE COMICS #1 $4,750.00 / FUTURE COMICS #2 $1,900.00 / FUTURE COMICS #3 $1,385.00

1941

FEATURE BOOK #25 $2,200.00 / FEATURE BOOK #26 $1,800.00 / FEATURE BOOK #24 $1,450.00

1942

MAGIC COMICS #30 $385.00 / FEATURE BOOK #29 $275.00 / FEATURE BOOK #31 $275.00

1943

FEATURE BOOK #39 $750.00 / AMERICAN LIBRARY #1 $550.00 / AMERICAN LIBRARY #2 $385.00

1944

FEATURE BOOK #40 $250.00 / FEATURE BOOK #42 $250.00 / FEATURE BOOK #41 $220.00

1945

FEATURE BOOK #46 $750.00 / FEATURE BOOK #43 $250.00 / FEATURE BOOK #45 $250.00

1946

FEATURE BOOK #48 $1,375.00 / FEATURE BOOK #49 $500.00 / FEATURE BOOK #50 $500.00

1947

BLONDIE COMICS #1 $450.00 / KATZENJAMMER KIDS #1 $235.00 / KATZENJAMMER KIDS #2 $115.00

1948

FEATURE BOOK #52 $600.00 / FEATURE BOOK #53 $600.00 / FEATURE BOOK #55 $600.00

1949

BLONDIE COMICS #8 $135.00 / BLONDIE COMICS #9 $135.00 / BLONDIE COMICS #10 $135.00

 

Copyright 1995-2013 by Terry Hoknes at hoknes@hotmail.com  www.HoknesComics.com  / Overstreet Price Guide Data is copyright 1970-2013 by Bob Overstreet & Gemstone Publishing, other info and data reprinted from Ebay at www.ebay.com  , Heritage Auctions at www.ha.com  , Comichron at http://www.comichron.com / , CGC census info from www.cgccomics.com  , GP Analysis from www.gpanalysis.com  , Doug Sulipa at www.dwscw.com and comic cover artwork at www.comics.org